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Where you can find the London addresses that were important to famous Irish people and of people who were important to Ireland.

A Monument to Hurling in Camberwell

Liam MacCarthy, donor of The MacCarthy all Ireland hurling cup, born in Southwark to Cork parents 1853, died 1828. Buried Camberwell Old Cemetery, Forest Hill Road, East Dulwich, SE22 0RU.

coming soon… Sam Maguire

liam-maccarthy

picture courtesy of Wikimedia Commons (mural from Falls Road, Belfast)

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A great playwright, whose name sounds like a character from Shrek

George Farquhar, born in Derry 1677, died London 1707, buried in St Martin in The Fields.

Author of The Beau Stratagem and The Recruiting Sergeant, he is credited with writing the first modern Irish play (Love in a Bottle).

To find out more gems like this, contact, Tony McDonnell on his website or join his Emerald City Tour on Sunday 4 September 2016, from St Pauls (west side) at 2pm.

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image courtesy of Wikimedia commons

Terrible Beauty: the 1916 Rebellion in London

 

Death and rebirth. Love and loathing. Independence and Empire; this tour has it all.

After Dublin, London was the city most connected to the Easter Rising. Not just as the seat of government from which the rebels fought to break free but through the deep connections many of them held with this city.

Exactly 100 years on, this lively tour will turn the walk from Trafalgar Square to Whitehall into an amazing journey through the vortex of change released by the rebellion. This is the London side of the 1916 story.

Turn up on the day and relive the excitement of those times with expert London Blue Badge Tourist Guide, Tony McDonnell. You can phone Tony on 07850 184790 for more information.

Get involved; Sunday 24 April: 4.30pm: Nelson’s Column, Trafalgar Square (Tony is easy to spot) Price: £10, concessions £8.

Just some of the names with London connections., from left: Padraig Pearse, father born in London. Erskine Childers, born in London. Countess Markievicz, born in London. Michael Collins worked in London. Pictures with thanks to Wikimedia Commons

 patrick_pearseFile:Countess Markievicz.jpg

Not your average clergyman’s daughter

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Photo By Henry Herschel Hay Cameron – Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37933743

Alice Stopford Green, Historian and Nationalist (born Co. Meath 1847 – 1929). Lived at 30 Grosvenor Road SW1 where she helped plan the Howth gun-running.

She used her own money to partly pay for 1,500 rifles plus 45,000 rounds of ammunition. In 1914 these were brought across the North Sea in the yacht, Asgard, whose skillful crew included Erskine Childers. The arms and ammunition were landed at Howth Harbour on July 26th.  She was the daughter of a Church of Ireland clergyman and married to the Oxford historian J R Green.

Entry courtesy of research by Tony McDonnell. Discover the Irish Geography of London and walk in the steps of the greats of Irish history this Thursday 17 March and again on Sunday 20 March, both at 2 O’ clock from the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral.

Email Tony at, tonymcdonnellbbg@hotmail.com phone him on 07850184790 – or better still just turn up for this exciting tour.

The electron is an Offaly invention

File:GeorgeJohnstoneStoney(1826-1911),Undated(DateGuessedEarly1890s).jpgPhotograph courtesy Wikimedia Commons

George Johnstone STONEY, physicist, 1826 – 1911. Born Oakley Park between Clareen and Birr Co. Offaly, died at his home 30 Chepstow Crescent, Notting Hill W11. Of his many important discoveries, his coining of the word ‘electron’ had probably the widest application.

This St Patrick’s Day – Thursday March 17th and again on Sunday 20th March, Tony McDonnell, Blue Badge Tourist Guide will lead two of his famous Emerald City Tours.

Both tours start off from the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral at 2:00. The tours take about two and a half hours and are an easy walk – break included. If you can’t find him on the steps, ring him at 07850 184790.

The tour brings Irish history alive like nothing else, listening to Tony is like living the history – take your first step into Irish history of London this month.

 

 

Making them come alive – this month

READ(1879) p2.655 DANIEL O'CONNELL.jpg   Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

This St Patrick’s Day – Thursday March 17th – and on Sunday 20th March Blue Badge Tourist Guide Tony McDonnell will lead two Emerald City Tours.

The erudite and entertaining Tony can bring Irish history alive conjuring up characters as large as Wolfe Tone, Daniel O’ Connell and W.B. Yeats. Both tours will start at at 2 p.m., from the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral they take about two hours (including a break) and are an easy walk – if you need more information  please phone Tony on 07850 184790.

The £10 charge is terrific value – and you can ask about the 1916 tour he is planning.

Take the first step and discover Irish history in London.

 

 

The coolest scientist

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William Thomson, Lord Kelvin physicist born Belfast 1824 died 1907. President of the Royal Society 1885 – 1890. Interred (near Isaac Newton) in Westminster Abbey.

Among a lifetime of discovery he correctly determined the value of absolute zero, zero degrees Kelvin or minus 273.15 degrees centigrade – the coldest possible temperature and theoretically impossible to reach.

Kitchener was a Kerryman

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Picture credit: Alfred Leete [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Horatio Herbert Kitchener (Lord Kitchener of Khartoum), secretary of State for War. Born Ballylongford Co. Kerry 1850 lost at sea 1916 when his ship, HMS Hampshire, hit a mine (the subject of conspiracy theories, one involving Irish Republicans).

All Souls’ Chapel in the North West of  St Paul’s Cathedral is dedicated to Lord Kitchener’s memory.  

File:Lord Kitchener's tomb, St Paul's Cathedral, London.JPGBy Stephencdickson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Blue-Badge Tour Guide, Tony McDonnell, brings all these topics to life in his Emerald City Tours of London, his number is 07850 184790.

 

A London walk this weekend

The erudite and entertaining Tony McDonnell will be leading his famous Camden walk, When the String Broke, literally exploring the Irish connection with Camden – which was as far as the poor migrant got from Euston before the string broke on the suitcase.

The walk starts from Camden tube station (Kentish Town side) at 10:30 this Sunday.  There is a fee but it’s great value for the two or more hours of education, entertainment and light exercise that Blue-Badge guide Tony offers. He will be happy to answer your questions, his number is 07850 184790.

Last Sunday, on the Emerald City Tour, Tony led a very convivial group from St Paul’s to Covent Garden. In about two and a half hours we walked in the footsteps of Oscar Wilde, GB Shaw, WB Yeats, Oliver Goldsmith, Samuel Johnson and William Gladstone to name the proverbial few.

As Goldsmith might have said, “…and still they gazed and still the wonder grew that one small head should carry all it knew.”

Ireland’s largest emigrant takes centre stage

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Photo: Natural History Museum London by Denis Bourez (France) via WikiCommons Media – our thanks and appreciation.

London’s Natural History Museum announced recently that the skeleton of a blue whale will become their central exhibit in the Museum’s Hintze Hall from summer 2017. The whale was found injured in Wexford Harbour in 1891 and sold to the museum by William Armstrong. An example of the largest creature on Earth, she was 82ft long and weighed about 160 tonnes.

She replaces Dippy the diplodocus dinosaur – any suggestions for a name for the Irish blue whale?

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