on pavement grey

Where you can find the London addresses that were important to famous Irish people and of people who were important to Ireland.

Archive for the tag “Dublin”

Aberdeen connects Dollis Hill House with Áras an Uachtaráin

John Hamilton Gordon (Lord Aberdeen) owned and lived in Dollis Hill House, London NW2 from 1881 until 1897 where his illustrious guests included William Gladstone and Lord Randolph Churchill. (Mark Twain was later to stay at the house).

Lord Aberdeen was twice Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, in 1886 and again in the critical years 1905 to 1915 during these years he lived in the Viceregal Lodge in Dublin’s Phoenix Park, now the residence of the President of Ireland, Áras an Uachtaráin.

Incidentally, in an upstairs window of Áras an Uachtaráin, a constantly lighted lamp signifies the love and and remembrance on the island for those who leave it while welcoming them home. Maybe this is the Irish tomb of the unknown warriors?

Sunday June 4th at 10:30 you can join Tony McDonnell as he takes you through a different stratum of Irish society in his walk ‘Where the String Broke’, starting at Camden tube station. More details on his website.

Then on Friday 9th June at 2:00 he will be filmed for the Irish Post doing a guided walk from St Paul’s Cathedral.  It’s not a usual one – but you will be welcome, have great craic – and it’s free.

dollis hill house

image courtesy of wikimedia commons

Terrible Beauty: the 1916 Rebellion in London

 

Death and rebirth. Love and loathing. Independence and Empire; this tour has it all.

After Dublin, London was the city most connected to the Easter Rising. Not just as the seat of government from which the rebels fought to break free but through the deep connections many of them held with this city.

Exactly 100 years on, this lively tour will turn the walk from Trafalgar Square to Whitehall into an amazing journey through the vortex of change released by the rebellion. This is the London side of the 1916 story.

Turn up on the day and relive the excitement of those times with expert London Blue Badge Tourist Guide, Tony McDonnell. You can phone Tony on 07850 184790 for more information.

Get involved; Sunday 24 April: 4.30pm: Nelson’s Column, Trafalgar Square (Tony is easy to spot) Price: £10, concessions £8.

Just some of the names with London connections., from left: Padraig Pearse, father born in London. Erskine Childers, born in London. Countess Markievicz, born in London. Michael Collins worked in London. Pictures with thanks to Wikimedia Commons

 patrick_pearseFile:Countess Markievicz.jpg

Was ‘A School for Scandal’ inspired by Dublin or London?

A very warm welcome to the new followers of On Pavement Grey.

Please bear with me as I get comfortable with this whole scene. I hope this blog returns at least some of the pleasure yours have already given me.

Among other achievements, today’s notable wrote the play A school for Scandal. He was also a member of parliament and owner of the Theatre Royal on Drury Lane.

Map of 10 Hertford St, Mayfair, London W1J

Richard Brinsley SHERIDAN, dramatist born Dublin 1751 lived at 10 Hertford Street, London, W1 from 1795 to 1802. Buried at Poet’s Corner, Westminster Abbey 1816 – see the entry for Oliver Goldsmith. To defend the honour of his lover he fought a duel on the site of what is now Apsley House – see the entry for the Duke of Wellington.

Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Mrs Brinsley Sheridan by Gainsborough and Richard Brinsley Sheridan.

‘Dracula’ was born in Dublin but lived among us in London

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Bram STOKER, author of ‘Dracula’ was born in Clontarf, Dublin 1847 and lived at 18 St Leonard’s Terrace, London SW3. He died in 1912 and is buried in Golder’s Green, London.

Map of 18 St Leonard's Terrace, Chelsea, London SW3 4QG

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