on pavement grey

Where you can find the London addresses that were important to famous Irish people and of people who were important to Ireland.

The big fellah’ lived in London for nearly a third of his life

Michael Collins, revolutionary, born 1890 in Sam’s Cross near Clonakility Co Cork. He left there in 1906 to work in London where he lived and worked for nearly a third of his life.

 

In 1914 he moved into a flat at 5 Netherwood Road, W14 which he shared with his sister Hannie. A discreet plaque commemorates its illustrious resident.

Around the corner and behind the Olympia Exhibition Centre at 23 Blythe Road W14, is Blythe House, the Post Office Savings bank where he worked until 1910.

 

Thanks to Katie Walsh for sourcing these gems.

For more information, especially on Collins’ life in London, see Michael Collins: A Life by James Mackay, Mainstream Publishing 1996.

michael_collins_12_august_1922

photo courtesy of Wikimedia commons

He inspired a royal pardon and years later, inspired Hollywood

Colonel Thomas Blood, adventurer and inspiration of films was born in Co Clare during 1618. His most impressive escapade was not just his attempt to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London but to be rewarded with a royal pardon, money and land.

He lies by the Church of St Margaret, Westminster SW1P 3JX

thomas_blood

PICTURE COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

 

Less famous but just as formidable as her sister

Eva Gore-Booth, poet, dramatist suffragist and human rights activist was born in Co Sligo (1870). She rests at St John-at-Hampstead, Church Row, Hampstead NW3 6UU.

(Her sister Constance also features in this blog.)

220px-eva_gore-booth

IMAGE COURTESY OF WIKIPEDIA

Sam Maguire, more enduring than Sam Allardyce

Sam Maguire, born Mallabracca 1877, died 1927. Sat on the London County Board with Liam MacCarthy. Recruited Michael Collins into the IRB. London Hibernians to their All-Ireland finals at the turn of the century. Worked at Mount Pleasant Post Office, Clerkenwell EC1A 1BB. Best remembered by the All-Ireland senior football trophy, The Sam Maguire Cup.

sam_maguire_cup

 

 

 

A Monument to Hurling in Camberwell

Liam MacCarthy, donor of The MacCarthy all Ireland hurling cup, born in Southwark to Cork parents 1853, died 1828. Buried Camberwell Old Cemetery, Forest Hill Road, East Dulwich, SE22 0RU.

coming soon… Sam Maguire

liam-maccarthy

picture courtesy of Wikimedia Commons (mural from Falls Road, Belfast)

A great playwright, whose name sounds like a character from Shrek

George Farquhar, born in Derry 1677, died London 1707, buried in St Martin in The Fields.

Author of The Beau Stratagem and The Recruiting Sergeant, he is credited with writing the first modern Irish play (Love in a Bottle).

To find out more gems like this, contact, Tony McDonnell on his website or join his Emerald City Tour on Sunday 4 September 2016, from St Pauls (west side) at 2pm.

ifarguh001p1

image courtesy of Wikimedia commons

Terrible Beauty: the 1916 Rebellion in London

 

Death and rebirth. Love and loathing. Independence and Empire; this tour has it all.

After Dublin, London was the city most connected to the Easter Rising. Not just as the seat of government from which the rebels fought to break free but through the deep connections many of them held with this city.

Exactly 100 years on, this lively tour will turn the walk from Trafalgar Square to Whitehall into an amazing journey through the vortex of change released by the rebellion. This is the London side of the 1916 story.

Turn up on the day and relive the excitement of those times with expert London Blue Badge Tourist Guide, Tony McDonnell. You can phone Tony on 07850 184790 for more information.

Get involved; Sunday 24 April: 4.30pm: Nelson’s Column, Trafalgar Square (Tony is easy to spot) Price: £10, concessions £8.

Just some of the names with London connections., from left: Padraig Pearse, father born in London. Erskine Childers, born in London. Countess Markievicz, born in London. Michael Collins worked in London. Pictures with thanks to Wikimedia Commons

 patrick_pearseFile:Countess Markievicz.jpg

Not your average clergyman’s daughter

Alicestopfordgreen.jpg

Photo By Henry Herschel Hay Cameron – Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37933743

Alice Stopford Green, Historian and Nationalist (born Co. Meath 1847 – 1929). Lived at 30 Grosvenor Road SW1 where she helped plan the Howth gun-running.

She used her own money to partly pay for 1,500 rifles plus 45,000 rounds of ammunition. In 1914 these were brought across the North Sea in the yacht, Asgard, whose skillful crew included Erskine Childers. The arms and ammunition were landed at Howth Harbour on July 26th.  She was the daughter of a Church of Ireland clergyman and married to the Oxford historian J R Green.

Entry courtesy of research by Tony McDonnell. Discover the Irish Geography of London and walk in the steps of the greats of Irish history this Thursday 17 March and again on Sunday 20 March, both at 2 O’ clock from the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral.

Email Tony at, tonymcdonnellbbg@hotmail.com phone him on 07850184790 – or better still just turn up for this exciting tour.

The electron is an Offaly invention

File:GeorgeJohnstoneStoney(1826-1911),Undated(DateGuessedEarly1890s).jpgPhotograph courtesy Wikimedia Commons

George Johnstone STONEY, physicist, 1826 – 1911. Born Oakley Park between Clareen and Birr Co. Offaly, died at his home 30 Chepstow Crescent, Notting Hill W11. Of his many important discoveries, his coining of the word ‘electron’ had probably the widest application.

This St Patrick’s Day – Thursday March 17th and again on Sunday 20th March, Tony McDonnell, Blue Badge Tourist Guide will lead two of his famous Emerald City Tours.

Both tours start off from the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral at 2:00. The tours take about two and a half hours and are an easy walk – break included. If you can’t find him on the steps, ring him at 07850 184790.

The tour brings Irish history alive like nothing else, listening to Tony is like living the history – take your first step into Irish history of London this month.

 

 

Making them come alive – this month

READ(1879) p2.655 DANIEL O'CONNELL.jpg   Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

This St Patrick’s Day – Thursday March 17th – and on Sunday 20th March Blue Badge Tourist Guide Tony McDonnell will lead two Emerald City Tours.

The erudite and entertaining Tony can bring Irish history alive conjuring up characters as large as Wolfe Tone, Daniel O’ Connell and W.B. Yeats. Both tours will start at at 2 p.m., from the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral they take about two hours (including a break) and are an easy walk – if you need more information  please phone Tony on 07850 184790.

The £10 charge is terrific value – and you can ask about the 1916 tour he is planning.

Take the first step and discover Irish history in London.

 

 

Post Navigation