on pavement grey

Where you can find the London addresses that were important to famous Irish people and of people who were important to Ireland.

Archive for the category “science”

The electron is an Offaly invention

File:GeorgeJohnstoneStoney(1826-1911),Undated(DateGuessedEarly1890s).jpgPhotograph courtesy Wikimedia Commons

George Johnstone STONEY, physicist, 1826 – 1911. Born Oakley Park between Clareen and Birr Co. Offaly, died at his home 30 Chepstow Crescent, Notting Hill W11. Of his many important discoveries, his coining of the word ‘electron’ had probably the widest application.

 

 

 

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The coolest scientist

File:Lord Kelvin photograph.jpg

William Thomson, Lord Kelvin physicist born Belfast 1824 died 1907. President of the Royal Society 1885 – 1890. Interred (near Isaac Newton) in Westminster Abbey.

Among a lifetime of discovery he correctly determined the value of absolute zero, zero degrees Kelvin or minus 273.15 degrees centigrade – the coldest possible temperature and theoretically impossible to reach.

Ireland’s largest emigrant takes centre stage

File:Denis Bourez - Natural History Museum, London (8900342705).jpg

Photo: Natural History Museum London by Denis Bourez (France) via WikiCommons Media – our thanks and appreciation.

London’s Natural History Museum announced recently that the skeleton of a blue whale will become their central exhibit in the Museum’s Hintze Hall from summer 2017. The whale was found injured in Wexford Harbour in 1891 and sold to the museum by William Armstrong. An example of the largest creature on Earth, she was 82ft long and weighed about 160 tonnes.

She replaces Dippy the diplodocus dinosaur – any suggestions for a name for the Irish blue whale?

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