on pavement grey

Where you can find the London addresses that were important to famous Irish people and of people who were important to Ireland.

Archive for the category “Irish history”

Sam Maguire, more enduring than Sam Allardyce

Sam Maguire, born Mallabracca 1877, died 1927. Sat on the London County Board with Liam MacCarthy. Recruited Michael Collins into the IRB. London Hibernians to their All-Ireland finals at the turn of the century. Worked at Mount Pleasant Post Office, Clerkenwell EC1A 1BB. Best remembered by the All-Ireland senior football trophy, The Sam Maguire Cup.

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Terrible Beauty: the 1916 Rebellion in London

 

Death and rebirth. Love and loathing. Independence and Empire; this tour has it all.

After Dublin, London was the city most connected to the Easter Rising. Not just as the seat of government from which the rebels fought to break free but through the deep connections many of them held with this city.

Exactly 100 years on, this lively tour will turn the walk from Trafalgar Square to Whitehall into an amazing journey through the vortex of change released by the rebellion. This is the London side of the 1916 story.

Turn up on the day and relive the excitement of those times with expert London Blue Badge Tourist Guide, Tony McDonnell. You can phone Tony on 07850 184790 for more information.

Get involved; Sunday 24 April: 4.30pm: Nelson’s Column, Trafalgar Square (Tony is easy to spot) Price: £10, concessions £8.

Just some of the names with London connections., from left: Padraig Pearse, father born in London. Erskine Childers, born in London. Countess Markievicz, born in London. Michael Collins worked in London. Pictures with thanks to Wikimedia Commons

 patrick_pearseFile:Countess Markievicz.jpg

Kitchener was a Kerryman

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Picture credit: Alfred Leete [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Horatio Herbert Kitchener (Lord Kitchener of Khartoum), secretary of State for War. Born Ballylongford Co. Kerry 1850 lost at sea 1916 when his ship, HMS Hampshire, hit a mine (the subject of conspiracy theories, one involving Irish Republicans).

All Souls’ Chapel in the North West of  St Paul’s Cathedral is dedicated to Lord Kitchener’s memory.  

File:Lord Kitchener's tomb, St Paul's Cathedral, London.JPGBy Stephencdickson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Blue-Badge Tour Guide, Tony McDonnell, brings all these topics to life in his Emerald City Tours of London, his number is 07850 184790.

 

Humanitarian gun runner hanged for treason

Sir Roger Casement (6188264610).jpg

Photo http: National Library of Ireland http://www.nli.ie/en/flickr-commons.aspx via Wikimedia Commons

Sir Roger CASEMENT born Sandycove, Co Dublin 1864, executed 1916 in Pentonville Prison London, following a period in the Tower of London.

Yes, Roger Casement was all of these things. In 1904 he produced the Casement Report exposing the brutalities of the rubber industry in the Congo Free State which was run as a personal possession of the Belgian King, Leopold II.  Later, as Consul General in Rio de Janeiro he investigated the brutal activities of the Peruvian Amazon Company against the Putumayo Indians.

During the first world war Roger Casement tried unsuccessfully to raise an Irish brigade in Germany. On Good Friday 1916, three days before the 1616 rising, he was put ashore on Banna Strand from a submarine and was promptly arrested. A shipment of arms he had organised was intercepted on the same day.

His trial attracted controversy and his conviction hung on the the placing of a comma in the Treason Act of 1351. As well as this, the British government secretly circulated sections of Casement’s Journals known as the Black Diaries, to undermine support by portraying him at the time as being sexually suspect.

His remains were repatriated to Glasnevin, Dublin 50 years ago when he received a state funeral.

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