on pavement grey

Where you can find the London addresses that were important to famous Irish people and of people who were important to Ireland.

Archive for the category “World War I”

Terrible Beauty: the 1916 Rebellion in London

 

Death and rebirth. Love and loathing. Independence and Empire; this tour has it all.

After Dublin, London was the city most connected to the Easter Rising. Not just as the seat of government from which the rebels fought to break free but through the deep connections many of them held with this city.

Exactly 100 years on, this lively tour will turn the walk from Trafalgar Square to Whitehall into an amazing journey through the vortex of change released by the rebellion. This is the London side of the 1916 story.

Turn up on the day and relive the excitement of those times with expert London Blue Badge Tourist Guide, Tony McDonnell. You can phone Tony on 07850 184790 for more information.

Get involved; Sunday 24 April: 4.30pm: Nelson’s Column, Trafalgar Square (Tony is easy to spot) Price: £10, concessions £8.

Just some of the names with London connections., from left: Padraig Pearse, father born in London. Erskine Childers, born in London. Countess Markievicz, born in London. Michael Collins worked in London. Pictures with thanks to Wikimedia Commons

 patrick_pearseFile:Countess Markievicz.jpg

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Kitchener was a Kerryman

File:YourCountryNeedsYou.jpg

Picture credit: Alfred Leete [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Horatio Herbert Kitchener (Lord Kitchener of Khartoum), secretary of State for War. Born Ballylongford Co. Kerry 1850 lost at sea 1916 when his ship, HMS Hampshire, hit a mine (the subject of conspiracy theories, one involving Irish Republicans).

All Souls’ Chapel in the North West of  St Paul’s Cathedral is dedicated to Lord Kitchener’s memory.  

File:Lord Kitchener's tomb, St Paul's Cathedral, London.JPGBy Stephencdickson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Blue-Badge Tour Guide, Tony McDonnell, brings all these topics to life in his Emerald City Tours of London, his number is 07850 184790.

 

The art of war and peace

Sir William ORPEN, painter born Stillorgan, Dublin 1878 died 1931, lived at 8 South Bolton Gardens, London SW5 (Studied art at the Metropolitan School and at the Slade School) an official war artist with an astonishing portfolio of powerful work.

His paintings and drawings say more than I can, and urge a visit to: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:William_Orpen

William Orpen, The signing of peace in the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles, 28 June 1919. 

Orpen, William (Sir) (RA) - The Signing of Peace in the Hall of Mirrors, Versailles, 28th June 1919 - Google Art Project.jpg

Ready to Start. Self-Portrait, 6 octobre 1917.Both pictures courtesy of the Imperial War Museum, London via Wikimedia commons

William Orpen-Ready to Start-1917.jpg

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