on pavement grey

Where you can find the London addresses that were important to famous Irish people and of people who were important to Ireland.

Archive for the category “Anglo Irish”

Terrible Beauty: the 1916 Rebellion in London

 

Death and rebirth. Love and loathing. Independence and Empire; this tour has it all.

After Dublin, London was the city most connected to the Easter Rising. Not just as the seat of government from which the rebels fought to break free but through the deep connections many of them held with this city.

Exactly 100 years on, this lively tour will turn the walk from Trafalgar Square to Whitehall into an amazing journey through the vortex of change released by the rebellion. This is the London side of the 1916 story.

Turn up on the day and relive the excitement of those times with expert London Blue Badge Tourist Guide, Tony McDonnell. You can phone Tony on 07850 184790 for more information.

Get involved; Sunday 24 April: 4.30pm: Nelson’s Column, Trafalgar Square (Tony is easy to spot) Price: £10, concessions £8.

Just some of the names with London connections., from left: Padraig Pearse, father born in London. Erskine Childers, born in London. Countess Markievicz, born in London. Michael Collins worked in London. Pictures with thanks to Wikimedia Commons

 patrick_pearseFile:Countess Markievicz.jpg

Kitchener was a Kerryman

File:YourCountryNeedsYou.jpg

Picture credit: Alfred Leete [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Horatio Herbert Kitchener (Lord Kitchener of Khartoum), secretary of State for War. Born Ballylongford Co. Kerry 1850 lost at sea 1916 when his ship, HMS Hampshire, hit a mine (the subject of conspiracy theories, one involving Irish Republicans).

All Souls’ Chapel in the North West of  St Paul’s Cathedral is dedicated to Lord Kitchener’s memory.  

File:Lord Kitchener's tomb, St Paul's Cathedral, London.JPGBy Stephencdickson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Blue-Badge Tour Guide, Tony McDonnell, brings all these topics to life in his Emerald City Tours of London, his number is 07850 184790.

 

Last posting was a saint this one a ‘sinner’

File:KittyOShea.jpg

Katharine O’ Shea (Kitty to her enemies) lived at 112 Tressillian Road SE4. Although born in Essex (1846) to a well connected family, her affair with and subsequent marriage to Charles Stewart Parnell stirred great moral outrage that affected the cause of Home Rule and altered the course of Irish history. A perfect example of not Irish but important to Ireland.

File:Charles Stuart Parnell cabinet card.jpgMap of 112 Tressillian Rd, London SE4

Pictures: thanks to Wikmedia Commons and Google

Was ‘A School for Scandal’ inspired by Dublin or London?

A very warm welcome to the new followers of On Pavement Grey.

Please bear with me as I get comfortable with this whole scene. I hope this blog returns at least some of the pleasure yours have already given me.

Among other achievements, today’s notable wrote the play A school for Scandal. He was also a member of parliament and owner of the Theatre Royal on Drury Lane.

Map of 10 Hertford St, Mayfair, London W1J

Richard Brinsley SHERIDAN, dramatist born Dublin 1751 lived at 10 Hertford Street, London, W1 from 1795 to 1802. Buried at Poet’s Corner, Westminster Abbey 1816 – see the entry for Oliver Goldsmith. To defend the honour of his lover he fought a duel on the site of what is now Apsley House – see the entry for the Duke of Wellington.

Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Mrs Brinsley Sheridan by Gainsborough and Richard Brinsley Sheridan.

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